Home Flora of Missouri
Home
Name Search
Families
Volumes
Amaranthus viridis L. Search in The Plant ListSearch in IPNISearch in Australian Plant Name IndexSearch in NYBG Virtual HerbariumSearch in Muséum national d'Histoire naturelleSearch in Type Specimen Register of the U.S. National HerbariumSearch in Virtual Herbaria AustriaSearch in JSTOR Plant ScienceSearch in SEINetSearch in African Plants Database at Geneva Botanical GardenAfrican Plants, Senckenberg Photo GallerySearch in Flora do Brasil 2020Search in Reflora - Virtual HerbariumSearch in Living Collections Decrease font Increase font Restore font
 

Published In: Species Plantarum, Editio Secunda 2: 1405. 1763. (Sp. Pl. (ed. 2)) Name publication detailView in BotanicusView in Biodiversity Heritage Library
 

Project Name Data (Last Modified On 8/4/2017)
Acceptance : Accepted
Project Data     (Last Modified On 7/9/2009)
Status: Introduced

 

Export To PDF Export To Word

15. Amaranthus viridis L.

A. gracilis Poir.

Map 824

Plants monoecious. Stems 30–120 cm long, ascending or more or less spreading with ascending branches, glabrous or sparsely pubescent with inconspicuous mostly multicellular hairs toward the tip, unarmed. Leaves mostly long-petiolate. Leaf blades 2–8 cm long, elliptic to ovate or broadly ovate, narrowed or tapered to a usually bluntly pointed tip (often minutely notched at the very tip), narrowed or tapered at the base, the undersurface glabrous or sparsely pubescent along the main veins with inconspicuous mostly multicellular hairs. Inflorescences dull or dark green, axillary and terminal, the axillary inflorescences of elongate spikes, the terminal inflorescence a spike or panicle with few to several, long, ascending branches from near the base, the flowers often grouped into discontinuous clusters or regions along the basal portions of the spikes, the tip somewhat curved or nodding, the main axis and branches sparsely to moderately pubescent with inconspicuous, mostly multicellular hairs. Bracts 0.6–0.9 mm long, shorter than the sepals and fruits, ovate to oblong-ovate, narrowed or tapered to a sharply pointed tip, with a somewhat thickened green midrib and relatively broad, thin, papery margins, the midrib sometimes extending beyond the main body as a minute, short point, not spinelike. Staminate flowers with 3 more or less similar sepals, these 0.9–1.2 mm long, erect or ascending, oblanceolate to oblong-oblanceolate, abruptly tapered to a sharply pointed tip, the midrib sometimes extending beyond the main body as a minute, short point, not spinelike. Stamens 3. Pistillate flowers with 3 more or less similar sepals, these 0.9–1.2 mm long, erect or ascending, oblanceolate to oblong-oblanceolate, abruptly tapered to a sharply pointed tip, the midrib sometimes extending beyond the main body as a minute, short point, not spinelike. Stigmas 3, erect. Fruits 1.4–1.7 mm long, indehiscent, the surface usually strongly wrinkled when dry. Seeds 1.0–1.3 mm in diameter, angled along the rim, the surface reddish brown to black. 2n=34. July–October.

Introduced, known thus far from a single historical collection from Jackson County (originally probably native to South America; now widely introduced in tropical and warm-temperate regions nearly worldwide; in the U.S. introduced in states along the Atlantic coast and west along the southern tier of states to Arizona). Open, disturbed areas.

Amaranthus viridis somewhat resembles A. blitum in its slender, somewhat flexuous spikes, small flowers, indehiscent fruits, relatively weak stems, and broad leaves. Aside from quantitative differences noted in the two descriptions, it differs most notably in having leaf blades at most minutely notched at the tip, the axillary inflorescences elongate of spikes usually nearly as long as the terminal ones, and in its 3 sepals that are broadest above the midpoint.

 
 


 

 
 
© 2022 Missouri Botanical Garden - 4344 Shaw Boulevard - Saint Louis, Missouri 63110